The 2020 Annual Professional Biology Conference and AGM

Conference Theme: Professional Biology (un)Tangled

April 27 - Apr 30, 2020 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

Join us online for a unique opportunity to learn from leaders in various applied biology fields, and build connections across industry, government and conservation organizations. 

CONFERENCE PROGRAM AND WEBPAGE UPDATED APRIL 18


Register Today

>> REGISTER HERE

Early registration discounts for APB members extended to April 20!

*Become a member prior to registering to receive the member's rate.


 


Dr. Jessica Dempsey, Associate Professor, Faculty of Arts, University of British Columbia

How and why does biodiversity loss continue despite the proliferation of conservation laws and policies?

Read more »

Conference Theme: Professional Biology (un)Tangled

Conference Title: Supporting Biology Professionals to Lead in Applied Research and Resource Management in British Columbia

Tangled in conflicting policies and politics, competitive work environments, public opinion, mistrust of science, misconceptions about our profession, ethical commitments, and new professional governance legislation, professional biologists must forge a path to practice in applied biology in a scientific way. How can we support biology professionals to lead in applied research so that we can effectively manage natural resources in British Columbia?

Who should attend:
The APB annual conference attracts Biology Professionals, natural resources managers, researchers, industry representatives, First Nations, not-for-profit organizations, naturalists and biology students across western Canada.


Call for Abstracts

The deadline for abstract submissions is March 20, 2020. 
See Guidelines for Abstract Submission.


Conference Program

  • Mon April 27:  Evening seminar "Ecosystem Mapping in Applied Research and Resource Management in British Columbia"
  • Tue April 28:  Morning seminar "Species Distribution Modelling Using Occupancy and Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping"
  • Wed April 29:  APB Annual General Meeting, Conference Keynote Presentation and Plenary Session, Silent Auction Closes
  • Thu April 30: Half day session "APB Strategic Planning"
  • Thu April 30:  Afternoon seminar "Observer Reliability in Wildlife Tracking and Natural Sign Surveys"
 

Download the complete 2020 APB Conference Program (includes registration fee details).

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

A – MONDAY EVENING April 27 – ECOSYSTEM MAPPING SEMINAR

Ecosystem Mapping in Applied Research and Resource Management in British Columbia

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Monday April 27, 2020

The biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification (BEC) system has underpinned a variety of resource management products for decades, including terrestrial and predictive ecosystem mapping, sensitive ecosystem mapping, silvicultural prescriptions, land-use plans, SIBEC and wildlife habitat suitability models. The BEC system is an essential framework that helps resource professionals in BC make sense of and communicate information about terrestrial ecosystems. The ecosystem mapping seminar will feature speakers who want to discuss and delve into the history of ecosystem mapping and the BEC system, its evolution, its uses and interpretations, its benefits and pitfalls, and the future of BEC and ecosystem mapping in an uncertain and changing climate.

A1 Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping – Introduction: Deepa Filatow

Introduction to Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping

7:10 pm, Monday April 27, 2020

Deepa Filatow, BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy

Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping is a multidisciplinary description of the geography and character of ecosystems. It is critical to the understanding and management of ecosystems in the complex landscapes of British Columbia. There is an increased need for consistent and publicly available ecosystem mapping information that is easier to collect, interpret and view. A rekindling of the communication and collaboration between the Terrestrial Ecosystem Information Unit and the mapping community is critical in the context of rapid change in climate, land use pressures, classification, technologies, and evolution of inventory methods.

This session will start with an overview of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Information Unit of the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, and their role in Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping. The talk will include an introduction to the team members, their expertise and roles. The presentation will explore recent developments in mapping tools, templates and applications; used for data collection, access, and analysis, including:

  • Field data collection tools in Collector (ArcGIS), Survey 123 (ArcGIS), and Xforms
  • Templates and tools in the contractor package
  • Online applications for data access
  • Updates to the Ecoregion Classification and maps
  • Open source software and tools
  • Predictive mapping advances including the use of LiDAR
The Terrestrial Ecosystem Information Unit is seeking feedback and input from the mapping community on priorities and needs, as well as thoughts on the role of Professional Biologists in this multi-professional and multi-agency field of practice.

A2 – Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping – Mapping Classification and Codes: Jackie Churchill

Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping – Mapping Classification and Codes

7:30 pm, Monday April 27, 2020

Jackie Churchill, RPBio BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy

This session will build on the material covered in the Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping presentation by Deepa Filatow. PART 2 will provide an overview to the recent work and challenges in compiling a provincial list of standardized mapping codes for Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping in British Columbia. The session will be interactive and will seek to stimulate discussion and solicit input.

The map codes list is a key to allowable mapping units for new projects. It is also a data dictionary to both new and legacy mapping projects in the provincial data holdings. The list must align with an ever evolving biogeoclimatic classification, down to site series, described in the regional Land Management Handbook field guides and published through the database, BECdb. It must also contain the non-forested units mapped by realm, group class and plant associations. In addition, non-vegetated and anthropogenic codes must be used to map these entities across the landscape to facilitate analysis and GIS data integrity.

The presentation will provide a starting point for discussion and input on decisions and choices required to improve the map codes list. Data fields must also be designed so that ecosystems are described in a more consistent, user friendly and consumable structure. Potential topics for discussion and feedback include:

  • Use of 00 codes in site series fields
  • Appropriate use of two letter codes
  • Code submission process
  • Project specific codes
  • Use of assumed modifiers
  • Issues of scale
  • Update cycle timing
Some of the key goals of improving the map code list are to: (1) increase the consistency of data collection and mapping, (2) facilitate data validation, (3) improve map use through readability, display and ease of analysis.

A3 – Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification in a Changing World: Dr Sybille Haeussler

Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification in a Changing World

7:55 pm, Monday April 27, 2020

Dr Sybille Haeussler, RPF University of Northern British Columbia

Biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification (BEC) has underpinned terrestrial ecosystem management in BC since the 1970s and served the province well through changing times. BEC takes an takes an integrative, nonlinear approach to ecosystems that includes both top-down (climate level) and bottom-up (site level) drivers. This holistic, developmental view of terrestrial ecosystems is fundamentally compatible with complex systems science and provides the information content that is mostly missing in contemporary ecosystem ecology. Its continued relevance is nonetheless at risk in our rapidly changing world. In 2011, I published an essay suggesting that BEC formally embrace complexity science and outlining several modelling approaches for incorporating non-equilibrium ecosystem dynamics into BEC. I also presented suggestions for how BEC could excite and enlighten a new generation of ecosystem scientists and resource professionals. While I can’t say my efforts were successful, I look forward to revisiting that discussion with APB members.

A4 – Ecosystem Mapping – Skills Training Opportunities: Claudia Houwers

Ecosystem Mapping – Skills Training Opportunities

8:15 pm, Monday April 27, 2020

Claudia Houwers, RPBio, Terrestrial Biologist, EcoLogic Consultants

Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping is a multidisciplinary approach to stratifying the landscape and using the BEC system as it’s foundation. It is critical to providing land managers with a planning tool to manage forestry or other natural resource activities as well as conservation activities. As such being able to create an ecosystem map is a crucial skill to add to a biologist’s career toolbox. But how does one get started? How does one know what to do? Do we learn on the job? On the fly? Is that the best way to learn? This session will touch upon the conundrum of becoming a qualified ecosystem mapper within the context of a new era of Right to Practice. The talk will include a discussion of the challenges of designing and offering training courses and what future training opportunities could look like. The goal of the session is to initiate discussions among the ecosystem mapping community as to potential best practices and approaches to training and mentoring future generations of ecosystem mappers.

A4 – Introduction to April 28 Seminar – Species Distribution Modelling Using Occupancy and Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping: Mark Thompson

Introduction to April 28 Seminar – Species Distribution Modelling Using Occupancy and Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping

8:35 pm, Monday April 27, 2020

Mark Thompson, RPBio EcoLogic Consultants

A6 – Seminar Registration Fee

This seminar is included in the full conference registration

Seminar ONLY Registration Fee:

  • $35 Non-Members*
  • $15 APB Student and Retired Members
  • $25 APB Members Early Registration (until Apr 20)
  • $30 APB Members (after Apr 20)

*Become a member prior to registering to receive the member's rate.

REGISTER HERE

B – TUESDAY MORNING April 28 – SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELLING SEMINAR

Introduction to Species Distribution Modelling

9:00 am – 12:00 pm Tuesday April 28, 2020

Leah Andresen, Senior Wildlife Biologist and Biostatistician, Keefer Ecological Services

Holly Buehler, Geomatics Specialist, EcoLogic Consultants

Mark Thompson, RPBio, EcoLogic Consultants

B1 – Introduction to Species Distribution Modelling: Leah Andresen

Introduction to Species Distribution Modelling

9:00 am – 9:45 am Tuesday April 28, 2020

Leah Andresen, Wildlife Biologist and Biostatistician, Keefer Ecological Services

Join us for an in-depth introduction to the theory and application of Species Distribution Modelling in conservation biology.

Ms. Leah Andresen is an expert in population biology and ecology of terrestrial mammals. She has published a number studies that have involved various aspects of modelling for site occupancy, spatially explicit capture–recapture, population simulations, and species distribution mapping for ungulates, carnivores, lagomorphs and raptors. Some of her recent work has involved monitoring and occurrence of Collared Pika in Tombstone Territorial Park (central Yukon, Canada) as an indicator species for climate change. In Africa, Leah developed and managed a transboundary conservation project to improve prospects for large carnivore species at risk of extinction.

B2 – Bridging the Gap with GIS: Holly Buehler

Species Distribution Modelling – Bridging the Gap with GIS

10:00 am – 10:45 am Tuesday April 28, 2020

Holly Buehler, Geomatics Specialist, EcoLogic Consultants

My presentation is focused on improving communication and workflow between the wildlife model designer (i.e. biologist) and the wildlife model implementer (i.e. GIS tech). This topic extends beyond wildlife models to all interactions among professionals requiring spatial data analyses, and will be of interest to a broad audience.

B3 – The Logic of Statistical Inference in Species Distribution Models: Mark Thomson

The Logic of Statistical Inference in Species Distribution Models

11:00 am – 11:45 am Tuesday April 28, 2020

Mark Thompson, RPBio, EcoLogic Consultants

Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are becoming widely employed in ecological studies as higher resolution remote sensing data has entered into the public domain. Review papers on the performance, reproducibility, reliability, precision, and accuracy of SDMs are coming hot off the press in each monthly issue of journal publications that is making it difficult to interpret and understand the science. This talk will dig into the fundamentals of the logic in SDMs in an effort to assist with the interpretation of the results in line with the aim of science and logic of discovery. A key message is that statistical hypotheses are fundamentally different from explanatory hypotheses that are inferred through observation. Statistical hypotheses are based on a theory of randomness and laws of probability. A distinction is made between design‐based v. model‐based inference and necessary v. sufficient causation to better understand the interplay between sampling design and statistical inference. Being informed on the logic and science in SDMs is needed to make effective use of the range of modelling tools that are becoming available as we make predictions and estimations on the ranges, distributions, and niches of organisms for conservation management.

B4 – Seminar Registration Fee

This seminar is included in the full conference registration

Seminar ONLY Registration Fee:

  • $35 Non-Members*
  • $15 APB Student and Retired Members
  • $25 APB Members Early Registration (until Apr 20)
  • $30 APB Members (after Apr 20)

*Become a member prior to registering to receive the member's rate.

REGISTER HERE

C – WEDNESDAY MORNING April 29 – APB Annual General Meeting

APB AGM

8:30 am – 9:15 am Wednesday April 29, 2020

FREE but registration is required.

C1 – AGM Agenda

*Become a member prior to the AGM to be eligible to vote!

Agenda includes:

  • Administrative Report
  • Financial Report
  • Resolutions
  • Awards and Scholarships
  • Appointment of Directors

C2 – AGM Registration Fee

AGM Only: FREE but registration is required.

REGISTER HERE

D – WEDNESDAY April 29 – APB Conference

APB Conference

9:45 am – 11:45 am Wednesday April 29, 2020

D1 – Conference Welcome: Mark Thompson

Conference Welcome: Mark Thompson

9:45 am – 9:50 am Wednesday April 29, 2020

Mark Thomson, RPBio APB President

D2 – Keynote: Dr. Jessica Dempsey

How and why does biodiversity loss continue despite the proliferation of conservation laws and policies?

9:50 am – 10:30 am Wednesday April 29, 2020

Dr. Jessica Dempsey, Associate Professor, Faculty of Arts, University of British Columbia.

Towards answering this, Dr. Jess Dempsey studies how nonhuman biological life shapes and is shaped by political, economic, and scientific processes that are implicated in and respond to biodiversity loss. This has led her to interview green financiers in fancy New York boardrooms and scientists in paper-stuffed academic offices, study investments in conservation cattle markets in rural Kenya, participate in endless international biodiversity negotiations, and examine the intricacies of ecological-economic models.

Her award-winning book Enterprising Nature (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016) traces the rise of market-based and economistic approaches to biodiversity conservation, concluding that “selling nature to save it” has so far remained promissory, more utopian than pragmatic.

https://blogs.ubc.ca/jdempsey/

D3 – Plenary Speaker: Brent Matsuda

Salvage and Monitoring of a Coastal Gartersnake Hibernaculum after Dike Repair: How Collaboration can lead to Conservation Success in Unforeseen Circumstances

TIME TBA, Wednesday April 29, 2020

Brent Matsuda, RPBio, Triton Environmental Consultants

Lorraine Andrusiak, SNC-Lavalin Inc.

Erin Clement, City of Delta

Purnima Govindarajulu, BC Ministry of Environment, Ecosystems Branch

Katie Bell, Independent Consultant

Prior to the repair and upgrade of a storm-damaged dike in the Boundary Bay area of southwestern British Columbia, the City of Delta was informed of a snake hibernaculum that could be potentially harmed during dike dismantling and reconstruction. Local naturalists suggested that up to 50 gartersnakes (Thamnophis spp.) might use the hibernaculum, so an emergency salvage plan was created by the environmental monitor with support from the province since the work could not be rescheduled.

Surprisingly 577 gartersnakes of the three species occurring in BC were removed during the dike deconstruction. The snakes were overwintered at an off-site wildlife rehabilitation facility with morphometric data collected by the University of Victoria. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were used to mark 192 of the snakes before they were released back to the dike post-construction in spring 2015, coinciding with natural hibernation emergence, in a high profile, public release involving a local elementary school. Post-release surveys were conducted in fall 2015 to assess movement back to the hibernaculm for overwintering, and in spring 2016 to assess post-hibernation emergence.

During this time, 84 of 379 snakes caught had been previously PIT-tagged and 29 new snakes were tagged. Adjusting for multiple captures, 65% were recaptures indicating strong site fidelity. Of the snakes captured, 91% were Western Gartersnakes (Thamnophis elegans), 7% were Northwestern Gartersnakes (Thamnophis ordinoides), and 2% were Common Gartersnakes (Thamnophis sirtalis). Adults comprised 71% of captures, 20% were neonates and 9% were juveniles. The high number of recaptures during spring emergence and mating indicates that snakes still use the site for hibernation and the presence of neonates indicates that breeding is successfully occurring.

Long-term monitoring and data collection is recommended to assess population stability, survival rates, and other population parameters. The successful outcome of this project highlights that unanticipated construction setbacks can be resolved in favour of conservation efforts when collaborative cooperation occurs among the parties involved, in this case, municipal and provincial agencies, academia, consultants, and local residents.

D4 – Plenary Speaker: Lisa Helmer and Dallas Nikal

Collaborative Stewardship Programs with Indigenous Communities in BC

TIME TBA, Wednesday April 29, 2020

Lisa Helmer, RPBioBC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy

Dallas Nikal, BIT Wet’suwet’en First Nation

The Environmental Stewardship Initiative (ESI) and the Collaborative Stewardship Framework (CSF) are new and innovative ways of translating reconciliation into action in BC. ESI is a collaboration between the Province and First Nations in the northern areas of BC. CSF is a Framework supporting collaborative forums across the rest of BC. Together, ESI and CSF represent over 60 Nations working together with BC, on an area greater than 40% of the shared land-base, focussed on improving the approach to managing environmental values of shared interest and concern.

ESI and CSF are providing a venue through which technically sound, science-based collaborations can evolve. Since the inception of the program in 2016, First Nations and BC have been working together to blend “Western Science” approaches to cumulative effects assessments with Indigenous Knowledge, in a quantifiable, scientifically-verifiable manner. The long-term intent of this work is to ensure that First Nations are partners in the management of fish, wildlife, water and land values across BC, and that Nations are technically equipped with the tools to apply Indigenous Knowledge to the management regime.

The scope of the work includes:

  • Ecosystem assessment and monitoring
  • Ecosystem restoration and enhancement
  • Ecosystem research and knowledge exchange
  • Stewardship education and training

Through ESI and CSF, Indigenous communities across BC are informing what has traditionally been a BC Government-led management regime. Together, BC and First Nations are enhancing the approach to fish and wildlife management in BC, in alignment with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Key features that make ESI and CSF unique are:

  • A collaborative foundation that has been jointly created by BC and First Nations;
  • The presence of First Nation hereditary and elected leadership working together;
  • All aspects of project management, from budget decisions to field study and sampling design, are addressed collaboratively;
  • The establishment of trust in relationships is leading to the development of trusted data;
  • Those data are reaching statutory decision makers, and are informing a new approach to resource management;
  • Assessment and monitoring approaches are building off existing standardized methodologies contained in the Resource Inventory Standards Committee (RISC), Provincial Cumulative Effects Framework, Forest and Range Evaluation Program (FREP), and Watershed Assessment Protocols.
  • Registered Professional Biologists in BC are working with First Nations to share data collection methodology, and are learning how to incorporate Indigenous Knowledge into scientifically robust systems.
  • First Nations youth participants are exposed to training, field work, project management and reporting procedures that are contributing to their development as the next generation of leading Biologists in BC.

ESI and CSF are in their 5th and 2nd year respectively, and have attracted significant interest from other Nations, Provincial/ Federal agencies, Stakeholders, Industry and NGO’s. The collaborative stewardship model is starting to prove itself, in the sense that BC is ready to truly support Nation biologists and technical staff in having a “seat in the truck” alongside RPBio consultants and provincial/federal staff. For decades, Nations have been underlining the need to be stewards of their own land. Culturally and socially, it is important that Nation members have opportunities to be out on the land. Through ESI and CSF, they are now collecting credible data that is going into the hands of Indigenous and Provincial Government decision makers.

Through our presentation, we will share:

  • An overview of the scientific approaches to value assessments that are underway in ESI and CSF;
  • Value-specific approaches to assessments, including Tier 1 and 2 modelled components and associated indicators;
  • An overview of early outcomes and management decisions that are resulting from the programs;
  • A Nation perspective on the importance of collaboration and shared decision making;
  • A provincial government biologist perspective on the positive results of collaboration;
  • A shared vision for the future of collaborative fish & wildlife management in BC.

D5 – Plenary Speaker: Dr. Jason Jones

Walking backwards into the future: Combining old school and new school skills to create a modern professional biologist

TIME TBA, Wednesday April 29, 2020

Dr. Jason Jones, RPBio EcoLogic Consultants Ltd.

Dr. Jamie Fenneman, EcoLogic Consultants Ltd.

Mr. Mark Thompson, RPBio EcoLogic Consultants Ltd.

Every generation of biologists has its own new ideas and technologies. Every generation also displays a tendency to become enamoured with these new ideas (i.e., neophilia), often to the exclusion of ideas of previous generations. The history of this ideological and practical neophilia is essentially the history of professional biology. In this presentation we examine (through the use of case study) how the thoughtful integration of old-school and new-school techniques and mindsets can create powerful tool kits for the modern professional biologist. Key examples to be discussed include (a) models to integrate traditional taxonomy with modern survey techniques to generate improvements in biodiversity assessments, (b) the incorporation of drone technology into boots-on-the-ground survey, ecosystem mapping, and verification, and (c) the combination of rhetorical technique, critical thinking, and social media to improve science communication.

D9 – Conference Registration Fee

Full Conference Registration Fee for Online Participation (includes seminars on Apr 27 and Apr 28):

  • $160 Non-Members*
  • $ 75 APB Student and Retired Members
  • $100 APB Members Early Registration (until Apr 20)
  • $120 APB Members (after Apr 20)

Full Conference Registration Fee for Online Participation – Group (3+) Discount:

  • $145 Non-Members*
  • $ 45 APB Student and Retired Members
  • $ 90 APB Members Early Registration (until Apr 20)
  • $105 APB Members (after Apr 20)

*Become a member prior to registering to receive the member's rate.

REGISTER HERE

E – THURSDAY MORNING April 30 – APB Strategic Planning Session

APB Strategic Planning Session

9:00 am – 9:45 am Thursday April 30 Identifying Priorities (Webinar-style Q&A Polls)

10:15 am – 12:00 pm Thursday April 30 Developing Strategies (Meeting-style Group Discussion)

Fee: FREE but registration is required.

APB members are welcome to join the Board of Directors strategic planning meeting to guide our priorities for 2020/2021.

E1 - Strategic Planning Session Agenda

You are invited to participate in one or both of the following:

9:00 am – 9:45 am Thursday April 30 Identifying Priorities (Webinar-style Q&A Polls)

10:15 am – 12:00 pm Thursday April 30 Developing Strategies (Meeting-style Group Discussion)

Topics of discussion will include:

  • Operational Plans
  • Members Benefits and Services
  • Programs and Committees
  • Communications and Outreach

E2 – Strategic Planning Session Registration Fee

FREE but registration is required.

REGISTER HERE

F – THURSDAY AFTERNOON April 30 – Wildlife Tracking Seminar

Observer Reliability in Wildlife Tracking and Natural Sign Surveys

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Thursday April 30

David Moskowitz Certified instructor for Cybertracker Conservation in North America as well as a consulting biologist, educator, author and photographer

For two decades, David Moskowitz has taught classes, lead expeditions, and given presentations on wildlife tracking and other natural history topics around the western United States, Canada and beyond. He is a gifted educator and an engaging, witty public speaker blending his deep subject matter knowledge with a sincere love of teaching and engaging others with natural world. He has years of experience working with teachers, wilderness guides, biologists, field technicians, and the general public. His slideshows and presentations blend personal stories from the field, cutting edge research, and stunning photography.

“David transports you to the wilderness through his photography and his compelling, entertaining storytelling. He’s the best kind of speaker: passionate, concise, intelligent and generous with anecdotes and details. All of this really makes his presentations come alive. ” — Florangela Davila. Voices of the Region Director, Forterra

F1 – Observer Reliability in Wildlife Tracking and Natural Sign Surveys: David Moskowitz

Observer Reliability in Wildlife Tracking and Natural Sign Surveys

1:15pm – 2:45pm, Thursday April 30, 2020

David Moskowitz Evaluator for Cybertracker Conservation in North America as well as a consulting biologist, educator, author and photographer

The use of wildlife tracking methods has been a fundamental part of wildlife research since the inception of the field. However, modern studies testing the reliability of data collected via natural sign surveys have found widely varying degrees of accuracy depending on the type of sign, the specificity of the data required, and the skill of the observer. Poorly designed studies or unskilled observers have contributed to grossly inaccurate assessments of populations of rare and sensitive species. Conversely, skilled observers can collect highly reliable and unique data non-invasively in a time and cost effective manner. Evaluation of local experts and professional biologists has demonstrated that wildlife tracking proficiency in the field is often not associated with academic scientific training.

The perception of an inability to reliably identify tracks and signs in the field, in conjunction with increasing accessibility of DNA analysis from scat and hair samples, and possibly decreasing practical field skills in the general population of wildlife researchers, has led to a decreased reliance on wildlife tracking for data collection. Despite this, even where track and sign evidence is not the primary data collection method, tracking skills are often employed in the set up and execution of wildlife research. Interpretation of sign found in the field is often invaluable in background work for projects such as determining locations for camera or hair traps or finding and capturing wildlife in order to attach telemetry devices.

Recognition of the value of wildlife tracking as a fundamental field skill for wildlife research, discrete from other parts of scientific training, can help effectively employ such techniques in the field. Cybertracker Conservation International conducts field-based evaluations of wildlife tracking skills in order to recognize and certify individuals’ wildlife tracking skills. As in all data collection methods, creating standards for accepting tracking evidence as verified is crucial to the reliability of projects that use these methods. The certification of observers is one method to help create such standards.

David Moskowitz is an Evaluator for Cybertracker Conservation in North America as well as a consulting biologist, educator, and photographer. He is the author of three books, Caribou Rainforest, Wolves in the Land of Salmon, and Wildlife of the Pacific Northwest: Tracking and Identifying Mammals, Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians, and Invertebrates.

Visit David’s website

F2 – Seminar Registration Fee

This seminar is included in the full conference registration

Seminar ONLY Registration Fee:

  • $35 Non-Members*
  • $15 APB Student and Retired Members
  • $25 APB Members Early Registration (until Apr 20)
  • $30 APB Members (after Apr 20)

*Become a member prior to registering to receive the member's rate.

REGISTER HERE


Register Today

Early registration discounts for APB members extended to April 20!

*Become a member prior to registering to receive the member's rate.

>> REGISTER FOR THE APB CONFERENCE, AGM AND RELATED EVENTS