Recipients of the 2017 APB Scholarships: Auguste dePennart and Lindsay Myers

Congratulation to Auguste dePennart who received the 2017 APB Scholarship for members.  Auguste is a third year student in the Applied Animal Biology Program at the University of British Columbia. With a strong interest for the conservation of rare and endangered wildlife species, Auguste hopes to help conservation efforts through animal rehabilitation. He plans to undertake graduate studies in veterinary medicine and specialized in wildlife care to be on the frontline of animal rehabilitation.  The APB is happy to present Auguste with $1500 in scholarship.

 

 

Congratulation to Lindsay Myers who received the 2017 APB Scholarship for non-members.  Lindsay is a student in Molecular Biology at the Vancouver Island University and a single mother to two.  She is dedicated and plans to specialize in the control of diseases and illnesses through research in the field of medical technology.  The APB is happy to present Lindsay with $500 in scholarship.

Results from the APB Members Survey on Advocacy

In August 2017, the APB Members Survey on Advocacy was launched allowing members to provide feedback and perspectives on priority issues and broad policy areas. There was also an opportunity for members to convey their expectations on the nature and scope that the APB’s advocacy should take.   The results of the survey were synthesized in September and will inform the advocacy pathway and focus for the Association moving forward.  See results from APB survey on Advocacy.

APB comments on the future of wildlife management in BC.

Association of Professional Biology Responds to Proposed Approach from Former BC Liberal government to Managing Wildlife in British Columbia through a separate agency.

  • The Association of Professional Biology (APB) represents an independent voice for Biology Professionals in British Columbia.
  • Sees the proposed new agency as lacking an essential science-based mandate
  • Asks that BC’s new government involves accredited, independent wildlife biology professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to inform decision-making with reliable science.

VICTORIA (July 10 2017) – In the spring of this year, the then BC Liberal government proposed a new approach to managing wildlife in BC. While details remain scarce, the Province proposed that wildlife be managed through a separate agency to roll out in fall of 2017. The provincial government identified a number of stakeholder groups that it would approach for developing this new agency. To date it is unclear who has been included in discussions other than organizations with a vested interest in the harvest of wildlife resources, mainly for commercial benefit. What are the plans of BC’s new government on this issue?

The Association of Professional Biology letter to Premier-designate John Horgan and Leader of the Green Party of BC Dr. Andrew Weaver stated, “The success of a new provincial wildlife management agency will depend on its ability to represent the diversity of values that our society holds for wildlife, which include inherent values independent of human use. Wildlife management is complex, because wildlife represents diverse values to people, and because species and ecosystems are dynamic. Yet the proposed agency does not appear to have any mandate to address the health and management of the ecosystems that BC’s wildlife depends on, or the management for Species at Risk.  Rather, its mandate appears to be the exclusive management of big game and fur-bearing species – wildlife that is harvested to generate revenue for the province and special interests.”

The APB has expressed its concerns over the need for the new Provincial Government to integrate sound science in stewarding natural resources in BC.  If the provincial government wishes to continue moving forward on this new wildlife agency, consultation must include organizations and individuals that are accountable to the public interest. The APB believes its members have a key role to play in that regard by bringing an objective, science-based perspective to the table.

Read the full letter: Letter to BC Government on Proposed Wildlife Mgmt Agency

The APB represents applied biology professionals who specialize in the study, management and conservation of living organisms and the environment. APB advocates on behalf of its members and promotes high professional standards and sound science in management of natural resources, as well as providing professional development and networking opportunities.

APB Contact: Pamela Zevit RPBio, Director of Advocacy and Outreach, 604-786-9521

email: pamela@professionalbiology.com

Emily Mercer – Recipient of the 2016 APB Scholarship.

Congratulation to Emily Mercer who is a member of APB and received the 2016 APB Scholarship.  Emily is an undergrad student in the Microbiology Department at the University of Guelph. She has been doing research in both the Environmental Sciences and Pathobiology departments. A world traveler and volunteer for international help projects, Emily plans to continue to graduate school and specialize in the field of human gastrointestinal health and disease.  The APB is happy to present Emily with $1500 in scholarship.

Bethany Arndt – Recipient of the 2016 APB Scholarship for non-members.

Congratulation to Bethany Arndt who received the 2016 APB Scholarship offered to non-members. Bethany is a biology student at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus. She has been working with an environmental consulting company, and doing volunteer work and information sessions on species-at-risk. The APB is happy to present Bethany with $500 in scholarship.

APB signs the Science Pledge

The last few years has seen substantial changes to regulation and legislation at the provincial and federal level greatly affecting the profession and practice of applied biology in BC. Indeed these issues go well beyond BC’s borders.

The Association of Professional Biology has a commitment to raise a voice on behalf of you our members. It is our role to address policy decisions or actions (and conversely inaction) that result in an environment where the ability of our members is to work effectively and responsibly is impacted. Examples include our response to the federal Bill C-38 (amendments to the Federal Fisheries Act) and subsequent meeting with federal representatives in Ottawa, or our testimony on a number of provincial task forces and review panels.

While our focus is at the provincial level, these actions reflect that there are times when there is a need to align ourselves on issues that go beyond BC’s borders. Recently the national advocacy organization Evidence for Democracy opened a call for individuals and organizations to show their support by signing on to a national Science Pledge, committing to support actions that put evidence before politics to uphold the security, health, and prosperity of all Canadians. The APB does not generally get involved in issue specific campaigns of this nature. However we of the APB Board and Executive felt that the “Science Pledge” reflected a high level of complementarity to the mission and purpose of the Association as well as the core obligations and responsibilities of our profession to protect the public interest.

With the increasing reliance on professional due diligence, the ever-changing regulatory landscape and increasing stressors on our biosphere we felt the pledge has come at a timely juncture in the work of the APB.

So today we would like to share with you that the APB has signed the pledge which reflects that as a unique voice for biology professionals, we believe that: “… all Canadians benefit when governments solicit, collect and use the evidence and expertise needed to make smart policy decisions that safeguard the health, safety and prosperity of Canadians. [We] support actions that invest in public-interest science; ensure open, honest and timely communication of scientific information; and make public the evidence considered in government decisions.”

If you have any questions please contact me at info@professionalbiology.com or 250-483-4283.

Recipients of the 2016 APB Scholarships

Emily Mercer – Recipient of the 2016 APB Scholarship.
Congratulation to Emily Mercer who is a member of APB and received the 2016 APB Scholarship.  Emily is an undergrad student in the Microbiology Department at the University of Guelph. She has been doing research in both the Environmental Sciences and Pathobiology departments. A world traveler and volunteer for international help projects, Emily plans to continue to graduate school and specialize in the field of human gastrointestinal health and disease.  The APB is happy to present Emily with $1500 in scholarship.

Bethany Arndt – Recipient of the 2016 APB Scholarship for non-members.
Congratulation to Bethany Arndt who received the 2016 APB Scholarship offered to non-members. Bethany is a biology student at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus. She has been working with an environmental consulting company, and doing volunteer work and information sessions on species-at-risk. The APB is happy to present Bethany with $500 in scholarship.