APB Sponsored CPD Events

One of the main priorities of the APB is to ensure our membership throughout British Columbia is provided timely, relevant training opportunities, workshops and webinars. Our mandate is to ensure competency in the biology profession, practice and related decision making processes. Please check our Calendar to see upcoming training, workshops and webinars provided by the APB and affiliated organizations. If you have a suggestion for a CPD training course, please contact the APB office .

Upcoming APB Sponsored CPD Events

WEBINAR:  INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS TOOLS IN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION | INTRODUCTION TO CONSERVATION PRIORITIZATION TOOLS
December 12, 2017
11:30am – 1:00 pm

REGISTER

Part 1:  Statistics and Natural Resource Management

The first part of this webinar serves as an introduction to the upcoming 2018 Statistics refresher course for biologists: in “R” Software, and the Applications of Marxan in Conservation Planning Course.  See courses offered in spring 2018.

DESCRIPTION
Why are statistics important for ecologists? Many ecological studies collect data that is noisy and hard to interpret using complex sampling and experiment designs. Statistics help ecology separate the signal from the noise and provides guidance if observed patterns simple artefacts in the experiment or real. Statistics also help deal with aspects of the study design that confound results such as imperfect detection confounding occupancy/ survival/ abundance/ movement etc. In this webinar, we will review some of the strengths and weaknesses of using statistics on ecological studies.

PRESENTER:  Dr. Carl Schwarz is a faculty member at Simon Fraser University. His research interests are in Statistics and Ecology, particularly in capture-recapture methods to study animal populations and environmental impact studies.

 

 

Part 2: Introduction to conservation prioritization tools

The second part of this webinar serves as an introduction to the upcoming 2018course: Systematic Conservation Prioritization Using “Marxan 2.0”.  See courses offered in spring 2018.

DESCRIPTION
Developing effective mechanisms to conserve biodiversity in human-dominated landscapes is challenging in part due to the high costs of land acquisition. Without the opportunity to transfer state-owned land into dedicated conservation zones, such as statutory protected areas, alternative approaches are needed to protect biodiversity and meet international treaty commitments to conserve 17% of terrestrial ecosystems by 2020 and beyond. I will use a case study by the Coastal Douglas-fir Conservation Partnership (www.cdfcp.ca) to conserve critically imperiled Coastal Douglas-fir ecosystems of the Georgia Basin of south-western BC by identifying high priority parcels for potential biodiversity conservation. I will further show how we test for the presence of trade-offs and co-benefits in the conservation of old forest and Savannah ecosystems. Finally, I will introduce ‘tax-shifting’ as a finance mechanism to conserve or restore ecosystem service values on priority parcels.

PRESENTER:  Dr. Richard Schuster is a quantitative conservation biologist and a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Carleton University. He researches how to use citizen-science data to make better conservation decisions. He produces user-friendly tools for visualizing complex data sets, and finding solutions to problems that matter to communities and stakeholders.

 

REGISTRATION:  TBA.

This webinar is free for members of the APB; $15 for non-members.


COURSES – SPRING 2018

USING ORGANIZED REASONING TO IMPROVE SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL WRITING
TBA

This workshop will give you ideas and tools to help you write technical materials such as letters, reports, or impact assessments so they are more effective and more transparent for your audiences, and are (to some extent) faster and cheaper for you.

Scientific technical writing constantly uses reasoning to reach conclusions. That process is called ‘argument’—meaning assembling a series of reasons, leading to conclusions, targeted for a specific audience. We address two sets of tools. The first provides principles and practices for creating clearer arguments relevant to different kinds of technical documents. The second shows tools for bringing the steps of argument into the written text of your documents.

The workshop shows how written technical documents contain common errors in their arguments and weaknesses in their writing. Participants practice assembling evidence and reasons for several different kinds of argument found in technical documents. We practice several steps, and introduce some computer-based tools, that show how to bring those improved arguments into technical report writing. We discuss how several organizations implemented these steps in their professional practice. At the end, participants will have a revised approach to planning, preparing and writing scientific technical reports that they can use on the job.

INSTRUCTOR
Dr. Glenn Brown is an ecologist, environmental manager and educator with over 25 years experience. He has worked on baseline studies, environmental planning, impact assessment, restoration and ecosystem services projects. In recent years he’s emphasized sharing tools of organized reasoning. Based in Vancouver, Canada, Glenn is an independent consultant and teaches in the Masters of Environment and Management program at Royal Roads University. More information at www.glennbrown.ca.

USING SCIENCE COMMUNICATIONS PRINCIPLES TO IMPROVE SCIENCE TECHNICAL WRITING AND VISUALIZATION
TBA

Scientists often express frustration with communications and writing. For Biology Professionals, reaching an intended audience with an intended message can be a challenge, especially when that audience may come from a different background. Devising an effective strategy for how best to frame your science for different audiences requires communications skills that often are not taught to scientists during their academic training.

Josh’s presentation will introduce participants to how small changes to writing style and structure can improve a document’s readability for a variety of clientele. We will also go over elements that lead to effective visualizations of data or scientific concepts. To explore this more fully, Josh will be leading a half-day workshop on Science Communications Principles at the APB’s Annual Conference in April 2018. The session will look more closely at these principles and best practices using case studies to demonstrate what works, what doesn’t work, and how to craft language and visuals to be accurate, understandable, and impactful.

INSTRUCTOR
Josh Silberg loves practicing and teaching science communication in all forms as the Science Communications Coordinator for the Hakai Institute—a BC-based NGO that focuses on coastal scientific research from icefields to oceans. He holds a Master’s of Resource and Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University and has researched everything from dolphins in Australia to whale sharks in the Philippines to rockfish on the BC Central Coast.

STATISTICS REFRESHER FOR BIOLOGISTS: IN “R” SOFTWARE
TBA

Many scientific studies are full of statistical jargon, tables of averages and other statistics, and results of statistical tests which purport to prove a certain hypothesis. The purpose of this course is to review some of the basic sampling and experiment designs used by ecologists and to understand exactly what can and cannot be extracted from a set of data. With the advent of modern statistical packages, the analysis of data is fairly easy, but it is far too easy to get nonsense results. This course will also review common pitfalls in the analysis of data.

INSTRUCTOR
Dr. Carl Schwarz is a faculty member at Simon Fraser University. His research interests are in Statistics and Ecology, particularly in capture-recapture methods to study animal populations and environmental impact studies.

SYSTEMATIC CONSERVATION PRIORITIZATION USING “MARXAN 2.0”
TBA

Marxan is a conservation software tool that, depending on the particular target and constrains of input data, produces spatial reserve systems for conservation purposes. It is the most popular systematic reserve software used in the world, and has been applied to conserving the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, Farallon Islands, Callifornia, and East Kalimantan, Indonesia, among other regions. It is a very flexible –and hence useful– in that it can incorporate spatially variable cost when computing efficient conservation planning, and that the computation method it adopts (simulated annealing) generates near-optimal solutions. This course will introduce a new way to solve conservation prioritization problems, using an easy to use Graphical User Interface for the prioritizr package in R.

INSTRUCTORS
Dr. Richard Shuster and Nina Morrell

Dr. Richard Schuster is a quantitative conservation biologist and a Liber Ero Postdoctoral Fellow at Carleton University. He researches how to use citizen-science data to make better conservation decisions. He produces user-friendly tools for visualizing complex data sets, and finding solutions to problems that matter to communities and stakeholders.

 

Past APB Sponsored CPD Events

WEBINAR:  INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIZED REASONING | TOOLS FOR SCIENCE & TECHNICAL WRITING

Part 1:  Introduction to Using Organized Reasoning to Improve Scientific Technical Writing 

The first part of this webinar was an introduction to the ideas behind the Organized Reasoning approach and an outline of the main topics addressed in the upcoming course on Using Organized Reasoning to Improve Scientific Technical Writing.  See courses offered in spring 2018.

PRESENTER:    Dr. Glenn Brown.   Based in Vancouver, Canada, Glenn is an independent consultant and teaches in the Masters of Environment and Management program at Royal Roads University. As an ecologist, environmental manager and educator with over 25 years experience, he has worked across a diversity of professions and disciplines. In recent years his emphasis has been on developing and mentoring professionals on employing tools of organized reasoning in report writing, communications and peer to peer networking. More information at www.glennbrown.ca.

Part 2: Using Science Communications Principles to Improve Science Technical Writing and Visualization

The second part of this webinar was an introduction to the upcoming course on Using Science Communications Principles to Improve Science Technical Writing and Visualization.  See  courses offered in spring 2018.

PRESENTER:   Josh Silberg loves practicing and teaching science communication in all forms as the Science Communications Coordinator for the Hakai Institute—a BC-based NGO that focuses on coastal scientific research from icefields to oceans. He holds a Master’s of Resource and Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University and has researched everything from dolphins in Australia to whale sharks in the Philippines to rockfish on the BC Central Coast. Josh has written science and policy-related articles for various online publications. More information can be found at www.joshsilberg.com.